Uncategorized

Thirty Years in Cuban Music

 

Paquito D'Rivera Quintet with Claudio Roditi
Paquito D’Rivera Quintet with Claudio Roditi
 
Berklee College of Music in Boston treats with seriousness and depth music I am passionate about. I spent my undergraduate career immersed in the poetry of Nicolas Guillen and emerging with an original song cycle, an honors paper featuring Cuban composers, and two class presentations based on his work. When I graduated, I abandoned my passion for Cuban culture because I realized that further research would require traveling to Cuba, which was illegal for me until several weeks ago. The recent news did not rekindle my passion, but Berklee did.

 

Brown at the piano
Brown at the piano
  
I spent five days as a student of the Paquito D’Rivera Berklee Latin Program. To consume knowledge and to be challenged were refreshing, but it was my first experience of being able to clearly communicate to my teachers my limitations, aspirations, and appreciation. Pianist Alex Brown guided, corrected, and encouraged me as I practiced new skills of chord voicings and rhythmic patterns to play within a small ensemble of students from Panama, Mexico, and the United States. I relished being bilingual during rehearsals. Ethnomusicologist Bertram Lehmann traced rhythms across three centuries, three continents, and a myriad of instruments in his two-hour lecture on Cuban music. I asked him what gaps were left in the research, and his answer inspired me to spend the next thirty years of my scholarly life invested in one of the topics he mentioned. Everything I had learned about Cuban music before this summer program was from a book or a recording, not from people who valued and mastered what I wanted to know.

Argentina lecture by Lehmann
Argentina lecture by Lehmann
Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Thirty Years in Cuban Music”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s